Dory Characteristics

  via:  en.wikipedia.org

Strictly speaking, the only true defining characteristic of the dory is that it is planked up with wide boards, "It should be well understood, that it is the dory's special mode of construction, not its hull shape, that sets it, and its related sub-types apart from other boats"[1]

More generally speaking, the dory can be defined as a small boat which has:

The hullform is characterized by a bottom that is transversely flat and sometimes bowed fore-and-aft. (This curvature is known as 'rocker'.) The stern is frequently a raked surface (a narrow transom) that tapers sharply toward the bottom forming a nearly double-ended boat. The traditional bottom is made from planks laid fore and aft and not transverse, although some hulls have a second set of planks laid over the first in a pattern that is crosswise to the main hull for additional wear and strength.

Despite their simplicity of design, dories are well known for their seaworthiness and rowing ease. Because of their narrow bottoms, they do not exhibit much initial stability and have often been called 'tippy'. They exhibit high ultimate stability, however, tipping to a point and then stiffening up significantly and resisting further rolling tendencies. Dories by design are quite voluminous and can carry a heavy load for their size and will continue to retain their great ultimate stability even when heavily loaded.

Read more at: en.wikipedia.org ...

Banks Dory

  via:  en.wikipedia.org

A banks dory used for cod fishing from the Gazela

The Banks dory, also known as the Grand Banks dory, is a small, open, narrow-flat bottomed, slab-sided boat with a very narrow transom. It was first used for fishing off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland after the 1850's.[1]

The boats were inexpensive to build. They could be stacked or nested inside each other and stored on the decks of larger fishing vessels which functioned as mother ships.

Banks dories have long overhangs at the bow and stern to help them lift over waves. There were one-man and two-man versions. The larger ones (12ft along the bottom or more) could be fitted with sails and a tiller. The dories became more stable in rough weather when they were loaded with about half a ton of catch.

Read more at: en.wikipedia.org ...

Sailing Dories

  via:  en.wikipedia.org

As the need for working dories diminished, the Swampscott or beach dory types were modified for pleasure sailing. These Sailing Dories became quite popular at the beginning of the 1900s around the town of Marblehead. They were generally longer, yet remained narrow with low freeboard and later were often decked over. Another common distinctive feature of the sailing dory was a long boom on the rig that angled up with a mainsail that was larger along the foot than the luff. The Townclass, a sailboat still raced today is a late example of a sailing dory. Earlier types were the Beachcomber and Alpha series, built by the famed dory builder William Chamberlain, and raced extensively in Salem and Marblehead between 1900 and 1910. [8] Few of the original Chamberlain-designed dories remain intact. An original Alpha Dory can be seen at the Marblehead Historical Museum in Marblehead, Massachusetts.[9]

Read more at: en.wikipedia.org ...

Swampscott dory

  via:  en.wikipedia.org

The Swampscott Dory is a melding of the earlier Wherry design and the 'new' construction techniques used in the mass production of Bank dories. The Swampscott dories were built with rounded sides and slightly less overhang in the bow and stern than a bank dory. This created a more shapely boat that handled better than a bank dory with the advantage of being easy and quick to build in the bank dory fashion. Swampscott Dories are generally from 14 to 18 ft in length, the longer boat being rowed by two oarsmen.

Eventually the Swampscott Dory developed into a recreational sailboat as well, known as the Clipper Dory, and then the Alpha and Beachcomber dory. These inexpensive sailboats were raced along the coast of Massachusetts during the early part of the 1900s. The sail rig was typically a Leg of Mutton and small jib on an unstayed mast.

Howard Blackburn sailed a modified Swampscott Dory named Great Western from Gloucester in 1899, and reached Gloucester England after 62 days at sea.

Read more at: en.wikipedia.org ...

Cape Ann Sailing Dory

  via:  www.instantboats.com

Read more at: www.instantboats.com ...

The Surf Dory by Lowell's Boat Shop

  via:  www.lowellsboatshop.com

Surf Dory

The round-sided Surf Dory, often referred to as the Swampscott-type dory, was developed from the original dory designed by Simeon Lowell with the founding of his shop in 1793. Even after the later development of the Banks Dory, fishermen who had to come into the beaches through the surf preferred the Surf Dory. The rounded bilges give extra buoyancy amidships, taking the boat up and over the waves onto the beach. As a result of the success of this design, the U.S. Life Saving Service, forerunner of the Coast Guard, used these dories for life saving missions for almost a hundred years.

Surf Dories are wonderfully seaworthy boats and more stable when light than the Banks Dory, thus we offer them in shorter overall lengths. They row extremely well and, because of their outstanding stability, lend themselves even better to sailing and family boating than the Banks Dory. Our standard Surf Dory and Sailing Surf Dory hulls are offered from 14’ to 20’ overall.

“The various successful adaptations of the classic… skiff built by the Lowell Boat Shop is testimony to the versatility of the design.” John Gardner (Classic Small Craft You Can Build, Mystic Seaport Museum, 1993)

Read more at: www.lowellsboatshop.com ...

The Gloucester Light Dory - Designed by Phil Bolger

  via:  en.wikipedia.org

Philip C. Bolger (December 3, 1927 - May 24, 2009), prolific boat designer, was born and lived in Gloucester, Massachusetts. He began work full time as a draftsman for boat designers Lindsay Lord and then John Hacker in early 1950s. Bolger also cites being influenced by mentors L.F. Herreshoff, Nicholas Montgomery, Howard Chapelle and his brother Bill Bolger.

The Gloucester Light Dory, one of Bolger's better-known designs

Bolger's first boat design was a 32' sportfisherman published in the January 1952 issue of the magazine Yachting. Since then, he has designed more than 668 different boats[1], making him one of the most prolific boat designers of the 20th Century, from the solidly conventional to extremely innovative, from a 114 foot 10 inch replica of an eighteenth-century naval warship, the frigate Surprise (ex-Rose), to the 6 foot 5 inch plywood box-like dinghy Tortoise.

Although his designs range the full spectrum of boat types, Bolger tended to favor simplicity over complexity. Many of his hulls are made from sheet materials--typically plywood--and have hard chines. A subclass of these designed in association with Harold Payson, called Instant Boats, so named because they are intended to be easily built by amateurs out of commonly available materials.

Read more at: en.wikipedia.org ...

McKenzie River Dory

  via:  en.wikipedia.org

The McKenzie dory or Rogue River dory or called by many a Drift Boat is an evolution of the open-water dory, converted for use in rivers. The design is characterized by a wide, flat bottom, flared sides, a narrow, flat bow, a pointed stern, and extreme rocker in the bow and stern to allow the boat to spin about its center for ease in manoeuvring in rapids.

McKenzie dories are specialized to run rapids on rivers, and first appeared on the McKenzie River in Oregon in the mid-20th century. They have a wide flat bottom for low draft, a narrow bow that is flat, often mistaken for the transom, which instead is pointed. The reason for this is that the rower faces downstream, therefore the part of the boat which first hits the waves (approaching from behind) must be pointed or very narrow to throw the water to the side. The bow is then widened so that a small outboard motor and/or anchor bracket can be attached. Those unfamiliar with the craft would say that they are rowed backwards.

River dories are mainly used by fishermen who wish for more control of their boat than that which a rubber raft provides. They are reasonably safe, yet river conditions must be kept in mind at all times.

Read more at: en.wikipedia.org ...

Crawford Boat Building: Gunning Dory

  via:  www.melonseed.com

Once in a very great while something wonderful appears that is ever so right and so hard to resist. The Gunning Dory has been that temptation for me, and perhaps when you explore the information here you’ll understand why and feel the same excitement.

Acadia 2005 #1` 094

The Gunning Dory has a shape and sheer line to swoon for.

Read more at: www.melonseed.com ...

The Old Wharf Dory

  via:  www.oldwharf.com

Old Wharf Dory
The Old Wharf Dory is a modern version of the Grand Banks fishing dory, well suited for rowing along shore. I developed the lines by combining and refining the lines from the 16' Lowell Coast Guard dory and Phil Bolger's Gloucester Gull. The length over all is 15'6", the same as the gull and the Lowell dory. Beam, both overall and on the bottom, is 6" wider than the Gull, giving the boat much more initial stability than the Gull. Depth midship is right between the two, giving the boat a more lively sheer than the Lowell dory. Transom width is also between the two, again contributing to the sheer line.

Read more at: www.oldwharf.com ...

Town Class Home

  via:  townclass.net

Affectionately known as a "Townie" she is a 70-plus-year-old 16 1/2 foot lapstrake dory hull designed and built in the early 1930's by Marcus Lowell in Amesbury, Massachusetts and later by his son Pert Lowell in Newbury, Mass..  Since the birth of the Townie, the Lowell family have produced an estimated 1,705 hulls in wood and finished an additional 315 in fiberglass.   The boats are still being constructed by Pert Lowell Company, which is now operated by Pert's son-in-law, Ralph Johnson.

Town Class sailboats have been racing since 1936 in Marblehead and since 1939 in Nahant with additional fleets in Spofford Lake, NH and Touisset, RI. They are admired for their classic beauty and forgiving sailing ability, while still being an exciting and competitive one design racing class.  While the Townie ultimately became a popular one design racing class there are plenty of owners who simply like to day sail their boats.

Read more at: townclass.net ...

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